Effects of PAH

PAH is a lifelong condition

PAH is a chronic, progressive disease. Progressive means that the symptoms of PAH will get worse over time. This may require hospitalizations.1

You play an important role in your treatment. Start by keeping track of your symptoms and how they affect you. Then partner with your healthcare team and set treatment goals.

PAH Functional Class*

Functional class is a common way to measure the severity of each patient's PAH. The World Health Organization (WHO) has defined 4 functional classes.2 The higher the class, the more serious PAH is. Make a note of your functional class each time it's measured. You can also talk with your healthcare team about your functional class.

Functional Class I for PAH Patients

Physical activity is not limited.

Can do regular activity without feeling dizzy or faint, being short of breath, feeling tired, or having chest pain.

Functional Class II for PAH Patients

Physical activity is slightly limited.

Comfortable at rest, but regular activity causes patients to feel dizzy or faint, be short of breath, feel tired, or have chest pain.

Functional Class III for PAH Patients

Greater limitation of physical activity.

Comfortable at rest, but activity is very limited. Less than regular activity causes patients to feel dizzy or faint, be short of breath, feel tired, or have chest pain.

Functional Class IV for PAH Patients

Unable to do any physical activity without discomfort.

May be short of breath, feel tired even at rest. Any physical activity increases discomfort.

*UPTRAVI is not indicated to improve functional class.